Wednesday 22 November 2023

s1 = {10, 20, 30, 40, 50} s2 = {10, 20, 30, 40, 50} s3 = {*s1, *s2} print(s3) Output {40, 10, 50, 20, 30}

 s1 = {10, 20, 30, 40, 50}

s2 = {10, 20, 30, 40, 50}

s3 = {*s1, *s2}

print(s3)

Output

{40, 10, 50, 20, 30}


In the provided code, three sets s1, s2, and s3 are defined. s1 and s2 contain the same elements: 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50. Then, s3 is created by unpacking the elements of both s1 and s2. Finally, the elements of s3 are printed.

Here's the step-by-step explanation:

s1 is defined as the set {10, 20, 30, 40, 50}.

s2 is defined as the set {10, 20, 30, 40, 50}, which is the same as s1.

s3 is defined as the set resulting from unpacking the elements of both s1 and s2 using the * operator. This means that the elements of s1 and s2 are combined into a new set.

The print statement prints the elements of the set s3.

Since sets do not allow duplicate elements, the resulting set s3 will still have only unique elements. In this case, the output of the code will be:

{10, 20, 30, 40, 50}

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