Wednesday 22 November 2023

s = { } t = {1, 4, 5, 2, 3} print(type(s), type(t))

s = { }

t = {1, 4, 5, 2, 3}

print(type(s), type(t))

<class 'dict'> <class 'set'>


The first line initializes an empty dictionary s using curly braces {}, and the second line initializes a set t with the elements 1, 4, 5, 2, and 3 using curly braces as well.


The print(type(s), type(t)) statement then prints the types of s and t. When you run this code, the output will be:

<class 'dict'> <class 'set'>

This indicates that s is of type dict (dictionary) and t is of type set. If you want s to be an empty set, you should use the set() constructor:

s = set()

t = {1, 4, 5, 2, 3}

print(type(s), type(t))

With this corrected code, the output will be:

<class 'set'> <class 'set'>

Now both s and t will be of type set.

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