Sunday 31 March 2024

Python Coding challenge - Day 162 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 

let's break down the code:

a = 5: This line assigns the integer value 5 to the variable a.

b = "10": This line assigns the string "10" to the variable b.

print(a + int(b)): Here, int(b) converts the string "10" to an integer, resulting in 10. Then a + int(b) adds the integer value of b (which is 10) to the value of a (which is 5), resulting in 15. So, this line will print 15.

print(str(a) + b): Here, str(a) converts the integer a into a string, resulting in "5". Then "5" + b concatenates the string "5" with the string "10", resulting in "510". So, this line will print "510".

So, the output of the code will be:

15

510

Happy Easter wishes using Python

 


import pyfiglet

from termcolor import colored


def wish_happy_easter():

    # Creating a colorful Happy Easter message using pyfiglet and termcolor

    easter_message = pyfiglet.figlet_format("Happy Easter!")

    colored_message = colored(easter_message, color='yellow', attrs=['bold'])

    

    # Additional colorful text

    additional_text = colored("\nWishing you a joyful and blessed Easter !")

    

    print(colored_message + additional_text)


wish_happy_easter()


#clcoding.com

Python Coding challenge - Day 161 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 

Code: 

def fibonacci(n):

    if n <= 1:

        return n

    else:

        return fibonacci(n-1) + fibonacci(n-2)

print(fibonacci(6))

Solution and Explanation:

The provided code defines a Python function fibonacci(n) that computes the nth Fibonacci number recursively, and then prints the 6th Fibonacci number.

Here's how it works:

The fibonacci function takes an integer n as input.

It starts with a base case: if n is 0 or 1, it returns n itself. This is because the Fibonacci sequence starts with 0 and 1, and from there each subsequent number is the sum of the two preceding ones.

If n is greater than 1, it recursively calls the fibonacci function for n-1 and n-2, and returns the sum of these two calls.

The function keeps recursively calling itself until it reaches one of the base cases, where it directly returns a value.

Finally, it prints the 6th Fibonacci number by calling fibonacci(6) and prints the result.

Let's walk through fibonacci(6):

fibonacci(6) calls fibonacci(5) and fibonacci(4).

fibonacci(5) further calls fibonacci(4) and fibonacci(3).

fibonacci(4) calls fibonacci(3) and fibonacci(2).

This process continues until it reaches the base cases (n <= 1).

Eventually, it computes the Fibonacci numbers for n=2, n=3, n=4, n=5, and n=6 and sums them up to get the 6th Fibonacci number.

So, when you run print(fibonacci(6)), it will output the 6th Fibonacci number, which is 8.

Saturday 30 March 2024

Python Coding challenge - Day 160 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 

Let's break down the code snippet step by step:

class MyClass:

    def __init__(self):

        self.__x = 10

Here, we define a class named MyClass. It has a constructor method __init__ which initializes an instance variable __x with the value 10. The __x variable is prefixed with double underscores, making it a private variable.

obj = MyClass()

We then create an instance of the MyClass class called obj. This invokes the constructor method __init__() of the MyClass class, setting the __x attribute to 10.

obj.__x = 20

Here, we try to assign a value of 20 to the __x attribute of the obj instance. However, Python is dynamically typed, so this line actually creates a new attribute __x in the obj instance, distinct from the __x attribute defined in the class. Since the attribute in the class is private, it cannot be accessed or modified directly from outside the class.

print(obj.__x)

This line tries to print the value of the __x attribute of the obj instance. However, due to the previous line, there are now two __x attributes associated with the obj instance: one created in the class and another created directly in the instance. So, obj.__x refers to the newly created attribute __x in the instance, not the one defined in the class. Therefore, it prints 20.

In summary, even though the class MyClass has a private attribute __x, the code snippet demonstrates how Python's dynamic nature allows the creation of a new instance attribute with the same name, leading to confusion about which attribute is being accessed or modified.


Thursday 28 March 2024

Python Coding challenge - Day 159 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 


Code: 

def bar(a, b=2, c=3):

    print(a, b, c)

bar(1)

bar(1, 4)

bar(1, c=5)

Solution and Explanation: 

let's go through each function call:

bar(1):

Here, only one argument a is passed, so a takes the value 1.

Since b and c have default values specified in the function definition (b=2 and c=3), they will take those values.

So, the output will be 1 2 3.

bar(1, 4):

Here, two arguments a and b are passed, so a takes the value 1 and b takes the value 4.

Since c has a default value specified, it will take that default value.

So, the output will be 1 4 3.

bar(1, c=5):

Here, two arguments a and c are passed, so a takes the value 1 and c takes the value 5.

Since b has a default value specified, it will take that default value.

So, the output will be 1 2 5.

In Python, when calling a function, arguments are assigned based on their position, unless you explicitly specify the name of the parameter (as in the third call). In that case, the argument is matched to the parameter name regardless of position. If a parameter has a default value, it can be omitted in the function call, and the default value will be used.

pytube library for downloading YouTube videos

 

# Get a specific stream
stream = yt.streams.get_by_itag(22)  # Example: iTAG for 720p MP4

# Download the stream
stream.download()

#clcoding.com 

# Get the best audio stream
audio_stream = yt.streams.get_audio_only()

# Download the audio
audio_stream.download()

#clcoding.com 





# Get streams with only audio
audio_streams = yt.streams.filter(only_audio=True)

# Get streams with only video
video_streams = yt.streams.filter(only_video=True)

# Get streams with a specific resolution
hd_streams = yt.streams.filter(res="720p")

#clcoding.com 

# Get all available streams

streams = yt.streams.all()


# Print available streams

for stream in streams:

    print(stream)


#clcoding.com 

# Get streams with only audio

audio_streams = yt.streams.filter(only_audio=True)


# Get streams with only video

video_streams = yt.streams.filter(only_video=True)


# Get streams with a specific resolution

hd_streams = yt.streams.filter(res="720p")


#clcoding.com 



# Title of the video

print("Title:", yt.title)


# Description of the video

print("Description:", yt.description)


# Thumbnail URL of the video

print("Thumbnail URL:", yt.thumbnail_url)


# Video length in seconds

print("Length (seconds):", yt.length)


# Number of views

print("Views:", yt.views)


#clcoding.com 




from pytube import YouTube


# YouTube video URL

video_url = 'https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMNKy_4opeE'


# Initialize a YouTube object with the video URL

yt = YouTube(video_url)


# Get the highest resolution stream

stream = yt.streams.get_highest_resolution()


# Download the video

stream.download()


print("Download completed!")


#clcoding.com 

Tuesday 26 March 2024

Python pattern challenge - Day 9

 


def print_pattern():

    num = 1

    for i in range(1, 6):

        if i % 2 != 0:

            print(f"* {num} * {num + 1} *")

            num += 2

        else:

            print(f"{num} * {num + 1} * {num + 2}")

            num += 3


print_pattern()


Explanation: 

Let's break down the print_pattern() function step by step:

Initialization:

num = 1: This variable is initialized to 1. It will be used to generate the numbers in the pattern.
Looping:

for i in range(1, 6):: This loop iterates from 1 to 5 (inclusive). It controls the number of rows in the pattern.
Conditional Printing:

if i % 2 != 0:: This condition checks if the current row number i is odd.
If the row number is odd:
print(f"* {num} * {num + 1} *"): It prints a pattern where an asterisk ('*') is followed by num, then another asterisk, then num + 1, and finally an asterisk. This is repeated for each odd row.
num += 2: num is incremented by 2 because each number is two units apart in odd rows.
If the row number is even:
print(f"{num} * {num + 1} * {num + 2}"): It prints a pattern where num is followed by an asterisk, then num + 1, then an asterisk, and finally num + 2. This is repeated for each even row.
num += 3: num is incremented by 3 because each number is three units apart in even rows.
Output:

The function print_pattern() is called, resulting in the specified pattern being printed to the console.
Overall, this function generates and prints a pattern consisting of alternating rows with different structures: odd rows have asterisks surrounding consecutive numbers, while even rows have numbers separated by asterisks.

Python pattern challenge - Day 8

 

def gen_tri(size):

    for i in range(0, size//2 + 1):

        yield ' ' * i + '*' * (size - 2*i) + ' ' * i

def print_heart(size):

    size = 2*size + 1

    for i in reversed(list(gen_tri(size//2))):

        print(i, i)

    for i in gen_tri(size):

        print(i)

print_heart(4)


Explanation: 

This Python code defines two functions: gen_tri(size) and print_heart(size), and then it calls print_heart(4).

Here's what each part does:

gen_tri(size) Function:

This function generates lines for a triangle pattern.
It takes one parameter size, which represents the width of the base of the triangle.
It uses a loop to iterate over the range from 0 to size//2 + 1. This ensures that the triangle will have a height equal to half of the base plus one.
For each iteration, it yields a string consisting of spaces and asterisks (' ' and '*') to form the triangle shape. The number of spaces (' ') before and after the asterisks decreases as i increases, and the number of asterisks increases accordingly.
print_heart(size) Function:

This function prints a heart shape composed of two triangles.
It takes one parameter size, which represents the size of the heart.
Inside this function, size is modified to ensure symmetry and compatibility with the gen_tri function.
It first prints the upper triangle of the heart by iterating in reverse over the lines generated by gen_tri for half of the specified size.
Then, it prints the lower triangle of the heart by iterating over the lines generated by gen_tri for the other half of the specified size.
print_heart(4) Call:

This line calls the print_heart function with size equal to 4.
It will print a heart shape where the base of the triangle in each half has a width of 4 characters.
Overall, this code generates and prints a heart shape made up of two triangles, with a specified size.

How to install modules without pip ?

 Installing Python modules without using pip can be done manually by downloading the module's source code or distribution package and then installing it using Python's setup tools. Here's a basic guide on how to do it:

Download the module: Go to the official website or repository of the module you want to install and download the source code or distribution package (usually in a .tar.gz or .zip format).

Extract the package: Extract the downloaded package to a directory on your computer.

Navigate to the package directory: Open a terminal or command prompt and navigate to the directory where you extracted the package.

Install the module: Run the following command to install the module using Python's setup tools:

python setup.py install

If you have multiple versions of Python installed, you may need to specify the Python version explicitly, for example:

python3 setup.py install

This command will compile and install the module into your Python environment.

Verify installation: After installation, you can verify if the module is installed correctly by trying to import it in a Python script or interpreter.

Keep in mind that installing modules manually without pip may require additional dependencies and manual handling of version compatibility. It's generally recommended to use pip whenever possible, as it handles dependency resolution and installation automatically. However, manual installation can be useful in cases where pip is not available or suitable for some reason.







Python Coding challenge - Day 158 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 

This code defines a function foo that takes a single argument x. The argument x is initialized with a default value of an empty list [].

def foo(x=[]):

    x.append(1)

    return x

Here's what happens when you call foo() multiple times:

First Call (print(foo())):

foo() is called without any argument, so x defaults to an empty list [].

Inside the function, 1 is appended to the list x, modifying it to [1].

The modified list [1] is returned and printed.

Second Call (print(foo())):


Since the default argument x retains its value between calls, it still holds the modified list [1] from the previous call.

1 is appended to the existing list x, resulting in [1, 1].

The modified list [1, 1] is returned and printed.

Third Call (print(foo())):


Similar to the second call, the default argument x still holds the modified list [1, 1].

Another 1 is appended to the list x, making it [1, 1, 1].

The modified list [1, 1, 1] is returned and printed.

So, the output of the three function calls will be:

[1]

[1, 1]

[1, 1, 1]

It's important to note that the default argument x=[] is evaluated only once when the function foo is defined. This means that every time you call foo() without passing an argument explicitly, the same list object (which was created when the function was defined) is used. This can lead to unexpected behavior if you're not careful, especially when dealing with mutable default arguments like lists or dictionaries.

Monday 25 March 2024

Python Coding challenge - Day 157 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 

#Code:

explain def foo(x):
    return x + 1
result = map(foo, [1, 2, 3, 4])
print(list(result))

Solution and Explanations: 

This Python code demonstrates the use of the map() function. Let's break it down step by step:

def foo(x): - This line defines a function named foo that takes a single argument x.

return x + 1 - Inside the foo function, it simply returns the value of x incremented by 1.

result = map(foo, [1, 2, 3, 4]) - Here, the map() function is used. It takes two arguments: a function (foo in this case) and an iterable ([1, 2, 3, 4] in this case). What map() does is it applies the function (foo) to each item in the iterable ([1, 2, 3, 4]), producing a new iterable containing the results. So, map(foo, [1, 2, 3, 4]) will apply foo to each element of the list [1, 2, 3, 4], resulting in [2, 3, 4, 5].

print(list(result)) - The map() function returns an iterator, so we need to convert it into a list to see the results. This line converts the result iterator into a list and prints it. The output will be [2, 3, 4, 5], which are the values obtained by applying the foo function to each element in the list [1, 2, 3, 4], incrementing each by 1.

Python pattern challenge - Day 7

 


a=[]

for i in range(7):

    a.append([])

    for j in range(7):

        if i==0 or i==6 or i+j==6 or i==j:

            a[i].append("*")

        else:

            a[i].append(" ")


for i in range(7):

    print(*a[i])


Explanation: 

 Let's break down the code step by step:

a = []: This line initializes an empty list named a. This list will eventually hold the elements of the 2D array or matrix.

The outer loop: for i in range(7):

This loop iterates over values from 0 to 6 (inclusive).

For each value of i, a new empty list is appended to the list a. This effectively initializes a new row in the matrix.

The inner loop: for j in range(7):

This loop iterates over values from 0 to 6 (inclusive), representing columns within each row.

For each cell in the matrix (each combination of i and j), the following condition is checked:

The if condition:

If i is 0 or 6 (first or last row), or if the sum of i and j equals 6 (indicating the anti-diagonal), or if i equals j (indicating the main diagonal), then a star (*) is appended to the current row (a[i]). Otherwise, a space is appended.

After completing the inner loop for each i, a contains a 2D list representing a matrix where stars (*) are placed along the main diagonal, anti-diagonal, and the first and last rows.

The final loop: for i in range(7):

This loop iterates over the rows of the matrix.

For each row, the print(*a[i]) statement prints the elements of that row separated by spaces.

Overall, this code generates a 7x7 matrix filled with spaces and stars according to the conditions specified, and then prints the matrix row by row.

Sunday 24 March 2024

Happy Holi wishes using Python

 



from colorama import Fore

import pyfiglet

font = pyfiglet.figlet_format('Happy  Holi')

print(Fore.MAGENTA+font)


#clcoding.com




import pyfiglet

from termcolor import colored


def wish_happy_holi():

    # Happy Holi message using pyfiglet and termcolor

    holi_message = pyfiglet.figlet_format("Happy Holi!")

    colored_message = colored(holi_message, color='red')

    print(colored_message)


wish_happy_holi()

Python pattern challenge - Day 6

 

# Function to print swastika

def swastika(row,col):

for i in range(row):

for j in range(col): 

# checking if i < row/2

if(i < row // 2): 

# checking if j<col/2

if (j < col // 2): 

# print '*' if j=0

if (j == 0):

print("*", end = "")

# else print space

else:

print(" ", end = " ")

# check if j=col/2 

elif (j == col // 2):

print(" *", end = "")

else:

# if i=0 then first row will have '*'

if (i == 0):

print(" *", end = "")

elif (i == row // 2):

print("* ", end = "")

else: 

# middle column and last column will 

# have '*' after i > row/2

if (j == col // 2 or j == col - 1):

print("* ", end = "")

# last row

elif (i == row - 1): 

# last row will be have '*' if 

# j <= col/2 or if it is last column

if (j <= col // 2 or j == col - 1):

print("* ", end = "")

else:

print(" ", end = " ")

else:

print(" ", end = " ")

print()

# Driver code


# odd number of row and column

# to get perfect swastika

row = 7; col = 7


# Function calling

swastika(row, col)


#clcoding.com


*     * * * *
*     *
*     *
* * * * * * * 
      *     * 
      *     * 
* * * *     * 

Python Coding challenge - Day 156 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 

Code:

def outer_function(x):

    def inner_function(y):

        return x + y

    return inner_function

result = outer_function(5)(3)

print(result)


Solution and Explanation: 

This code defines a Python function outer_function that takes a parameter x. Inside outer_function, there's another function defined called inner_function, which takes a parameter y.

inner_function simply returns the sum of x and y.

outer_function itself returns inner_function, effectively creating a closure where inner_function retains access to the x value passed to outer_function.

The last three lines of the code demonstrate how to use this function.

outer_function(5) is called, which returns inner_function where x is now set to 5.

Then, (3) is passed to this returned inner_function, effectively adding 3 to the x value set previously (5), resulting in 8.

Finally, the result, 8, is printed.

So, the output of this code would be: 8

Saturday 23 March 2024

GeoPy Library in Python

 

from geopy.geocoders import Nominatim

# Initialize Nominatim geocoder
geolocator = Nominatim(user_agent="my_geocoder")

# Geocode an address
location = geolocator.geocode("Mumbai, India")

print("Latitude:", location.latitude)
print("Longitude:", location.longitude)

#clcoding.com 


from geopy.geocoders import Nominatim

# Initialize Nominatim geocoder
geolocator = Nominatim(user_agent="my_geocoder")

# Reverse geocode coordinates
location = geolocator.reverse((26.4219999, 71.0840575))

print("Address:", location.address)

#clcoding.com


from geopy.distance import geodesic

# Coordinates of two locations
location1 = (18.521428, 73.8544541)  # Pune
location2 = (19.0785451, 72.878176)  # Mumbai

# Calculate distance between locations
distance = geodesic(location1, location2).kilometers

print("Distance betwen City :", distance, "km")

#clcoding.com



from geopy.geocoders import ArcGIS

# Initialize ArcGIS geocoder
geolocator = ArcGIS()

# Geocode an address using ArcGIS
location = geolocator.geocode("Pune, India")

print("Latitude:", location.latitude)
print("Longitude:", location.longitude)

#clcoding.com

Python Books for Kids

 



Think like a programmer with this fun beginner's guide to Python for ages 10 to 14

Kids can learn to code with the power of Python! Python Programming for Beginners is the perfect way to introduce aspiring coders to this simple and powerful coding language. This book teaches kids all about Python and programming fundamentals—and is packed full of fun and creative activities that make learning a blast!

In Python Programming for Beginners, kids will start off with the basics, learning all about fundamental coding concepts and how they can put these concepts together in Python to build their own games and programs. Each chapter focuses on a different coding concept—like variables, data types, and loops—and features three awesome coding activities to try. These activities get more difficult as they go, so young coders can see just how much their skills are growing. By the end of Python Programming for Beginners, they'll create their own fully functional sci-fi game and crack the code to a secret message!

Python Programming for Beginners features:
No coding experience needed!—Designed just for kids, this Python programming book is filled with step-by-step directions, simple explanations, and detailed code breakdowns.
Build a coding toolbox—Kids will build their programming skills, learn how to troubleshoot bugs with a handy bug-hunting guide, and practice their Python programming knowledge with cool activities.
Why Python programming?—Python is an awesome starting language for kids! It's a powerful programming language that can be used for lots of projects but features simple syntax so beginners can focus on learning programming logic.

Set kids up for a lifetime of programming success with Python Programming for Beginners .

Buy : Python Programming for Beginners: A Kid's Guide to Coding Fundamentals





Build and play your own computer games, from creative quizzes to perplexing puzzles, by coding them in the Python programming language!

Whether you're a seasoned programmer or a beginner hoping to learn Python, you'll find Coding Games in Python fun to read and easy to follow. Each chapter shows you how to construct a complete working game in simple numbered steps. Using freely available resources such as Pygame, Pygame Zero, and a downloadable pack of images and sounds, you can add animations, music, scrolling backgrounds, scenery, and other exciting professional touches.

After building the game, find out how to adapt it to create your own personalised version with secret hacks and cheat codes!

You'll master the key concepts that programmers need to write code - not just in Python, but in all programming languages. Find out what bugs, loops, flags, strings, and turtles are. Learn how to plan and design the ultimate game, and then play it to destruction as you test and debug it.

Before you know it, you'll be a coding genius!

Buy : Coding Games in Python (DK Help Your Kids)



Games and activities that teach kids ages 10+ to code with Python

Learning to code isn't as hard as it sounds—you just have to get started! Coding for Kids: Python starts kids off right with 50 fun, interactive activities that teach them the basics of the Python programming language. From learning the essential building blocks of programming to creating their very own games, kids will progress through unique lessons packed with helpful examples—and a little silliness!

Kids will follow along by starting to code (and debug their code) step by step, seeing the results of their coding in real time. Activities at the end of each chapter help test their new knowledge by combining multiple concepts. For young programmers who really want to show off their creativity, there are extra tricky challenges to tackle after each chapter. All kids need to get started is a computer and this book.

This beginner's guide to Python for kids includes:
50 Innovative exercises—Coding concepts come to life with game-based exercises for creating code blocks, drawing pictures using a prewritten module, and more.
Easy-to-follow guidance—New coders will be supported by thorough instructions, sample code, and explanations of new programming terms.
Engaging visual lessons—Colorful illustrations and screenshots for reference help capture kids' interest and keep lessons clear and simple.

Encourage kids to think independently and have fun learning an amazing new skill with this coding book for kids.


Buy : Coding for Kids: Python: Learn to Code with 50 Awesome Games and Activities




The second edition of the best-selling Python for Kids—which brings you (and your parents) into the world of programming—has been completely updated to use the latest version of Python, along with tons of new projects!

Python is a powerful programming language that’s easy to learn and fun to use! But books about programming in Python can be dull and that’s no fun for anyone.

Python for Kids brings kids (and their parents) into the wonderful world of programming. Jason R. Briggs guides you through the basics, experimenting with unique (and hilarious) example programs featuring ravenous monsters, secret agents, thieving ravens, and more. New terms are defined; code is colored and explained; puzzles stretch the brain and strengthen understanding; and full-color illustrations keep you engaged throughout.

By the end of the book, you’ll have programmed two games: a clone of the famous Pong, and “Mr. Stick Man Races for the Exit”—a platform game with jumps and animation.

This second edition is revised and updated to reflect Python 3 programming practices. There are new puzzles to inspire you and two new appendices to guide you through Python’s built-in modules and troubleshooting your code.

As you strike out on your programming adventure, you’ll learn how to:

Use fundamental data structures like lists, tuples, and dictionaries
Organize and reuse your code with functions and modules
Use control structures like loops and conditional statements
Draw shapes and patterns with Python’s turtle module
Create games, animations, and other graphical wonders with tkinter

Why should serious adults have all the fun? Python for Kids is your ticket into the amazing world of computer programming.

Covers Python 3.x which runs on Windows, macOS, Linux, even Raspberry Pi

Buy : Python for Kids, 2nd Edition: A Playful Introduction to Programming


Python Coding challenge - Day 155 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 


def func(x, y=5, z=10):

    return x + y + z

result = func(3, z=7)

print(result)

Solution and Explanation:

This Python code defines a function called func with three parameters: x, y, and z. The parameters y and z have default values of 5 and 10 respectively.

Here's the breakdown:

x is a positional argument.

y is a keyword argument with a default value of 5.

z is also a keyword argument with a default value of 10.

When the function func is called with func(3, z=7), it assigns 3 to x (as a positional argument), and 7 to z (as a keyword argument), while leaving y to its default value of 5.

So the function call func(3, z=7) effectively calculates 3 + 5 + 7, which equals 15.

Then, the value 15 is assigned to the variable result.

Finally, print(result) prints the value of result, which is 15. So, when you run this code, it will print 15 to the console.

Friday 22 March 2024

Creating QR Code with Logo

 

import qrcode

from PIL import Image


# Generate QR code for a URL

url = "https://www.clcoding.com"

qr = qrcode.QRCode(version=1, error_correction=qrcode.constants.ERROR_CORRECT_L, box_size=8, border=5)

qr.add_data(url)

qr.make(fit=True)


# Create an image with logo

image = qr.make_image(fill_color="black", back_color="pink")


# Add logo to the QR code

logo = Image.open("clcodinglogo.png")

logo_size = img.size[0] // 4

# Use Image.LANCZOS for resizing with anti-aliasing

logo = logo.resize((logo_size, logo_size), Image.LANCZOS)  

image.paste(logo, ((img.size[0] - logo.size[0]) // 2, (img.size[1] - logo.size[1]) // 2))


# Save the image

image.save("qr_code.png")

Image.open("qr_code.png")


Explantion of the code: 


This code generates a QR code for a given URL (https://www.clcoding.com) using the qrcode library and then adds a logo to the QR code using the PIL (Python Imaging Library) module. Let's break down the code step by step:

Importing libraries:

qrcode: This library is used to generate QR codes.
Image from PIL: This module provides functions to work with images.
Generating the QR code:

The URL "https://www.clcoding.com" is assigned to the variable url.
A QRCode object is created with specific parameters:
version: The version of the QR code (higher versions can store more data).
error_correction: The error correction level of the QR code.
box_size: The size of each box in the QR code.
border: The width of the border around the QR code.
The URL data is added to the QR code using the add_data() method.
The make() method is called to generate the QR code, and fit=True ensures that the size of the QR code fits the data.
Creating an image with the QR code:

The make_image() method is called to create an image representation of the QR code, with specified fill and background colors (fill_color="black", back_color="pink").
The resulting image is stored in the variable image.
Adding a logo to the QR code:

An image of the logo (clcodinglogo.png) is opened using the Image.open() method and stored in the variable logo.
The size of the logo is calculated to be a quarter of the size of the QR code.
The logo is resized using the resize() method with anti-aliasing (Image.LANCZOS filter) to prevent distortion.
The logo is pasted onto the QR code image at the center using the paste() method.
Saving and displaying the final image:

The QR code image with the logo is saved as "qr_code.png" using the save() method.
The saved image is opened and displayed using Image.open().
This code demonstrates how to generate a customized QR code with a logo using Python. Make sure to replace "clcodinglogo.png" with the filename of your logo image.

Python pattern challenge - Day 5

 



def print_pattern():

    for i in range(5, 0, -1):

        for j in range(i, 0, -1):

            print(chr(64 + j), end="")

        print()

print_pattern()


Solution and Explanation: 


def print_pattern()::

This line defines a function named print_pattern().
for i in range(5, 0, -1)::

This outer loop iterates over the range from 5 down to 1. The third argument -1 in range() means that it decrements by 1 in each iteration.
for j in range(i, 0, -1)::

This inner loop iterates over the range from the current value of i down to 1. So, for each iteration of the outer loop, this inner loop prints characters in decreasing order.
print(chr(64 + j), end=""):

Inside the inner loop, chr(64 + j) converts the integer ASCII value 64 + j to the corresponding character. Since we're starting from 'E' (ASCII value 69) and decrementing, 64 + j gives the ASCII value of the characters 'A' to 'E'.
end="" parameter is used to prevent print() from adding a newline character after each print, so the characters are printed horizontally.
print():

This print() statement is outside the inner loop. It's used to move to the next line after each inner loop iteration, creating a new line for the next set of characters.
print_pattern():

This line outside the function definition calls the print_pattern() function, causing the pattern to be printed according to the code within the function.

Thursday 21 March 2024

Python Coding challenge - Day 154 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 

def outer():

    x = 10

    def inner():

        nonlocal x

        x += 5

        print("Inner:", x)

    inner()

    print("Outer:", x)

outer()


Solution and Explanation 

This code demonstrates nested functions in Python, along with the use of the nonlocal keyword.

Here's a breakdown of what each part does:

def outer():: This line defines a function named outer.

x = 10: Inside the outer function, a variable x is initialized with the value 10.

def inner():: Inside the outer function, another function named inner is defined.

nonlocal x: This statement inside the inner function tells Python that the variable x being referenced is not local to the inner function but belongs to the enclosing scope (which is the outer function in this case).

x += 5: Inside the inner function, x is incremented by 5.

print("Inner:", x): This line prints the value of x from the inner function after it has been incremented.

inner(): This line calls the inner function from within the outer function.

print("Outer:", x): After the inner function call, the value of x within the outer function is printed. Since x was modified within the inner function using the nonlocal keyword, its value will reflect the increment done inside the inner function.

outer(): Finally, the outer function is called, which executes the code inside it and its nested inner function.

When you run outer(), it will print:

Inner: 15

Outer: 15

This output shows that the inner function has successfully modified the value of x, and the change is reflected in the outer function as well.

Python pattern challenge - Day 4

 



n = 7

d = n // 2 + 1


for x in range(1, n + 1):

    for y in range(1, n + 1):

        if x == n // 2 + 1 or y == d:

            print("*", end="")

        else:

            print(" ", end="")

    if x <= n // 2:

        d += 1

    else:

        d -= 1

    print()


Let's break down the code step by step:

n = 7: This line initializes a variable n with the value 7. This value represents the size of the pattern, specifically the number of rows and columns.

d = n // 2 + 1: This line calculates the starting position for printing the asterisks in each row. Since the asterisks form a cross pattern, the distance from the left edge to the vertical center of the cross (d) is set to half of the size of the pattern plus 1. This calculation ensures that the cross is properly centered horizontally.

The nested loops:

for x in range(1, n + 1):: This outer loop iterates over each row of the pattern.

for y in range(1, n + 1):: This inner loop iterates over each column of the pattern within the current row.

Inside the nested loops, there's an if-else statement:

if x == n // 2 + 1 or y == d:: This condition checks if the current position (x, y) is on the horizontal center line (x == n // 2 + 1) or the vertical center line (y == d). If the condition is true, an asterisk is printed.

else:: If the condition is false (i.e., the current position is not on the center lines), a space is printed.

After printing each row, there's an adjustment to the variable d:

if x <= n // 2:: This condition checks if we are still in the upper half of the cross. If true, it means we need to move the vertical center (d) downwards for the next row.

else:: If we are in the lower half of the cross, we need to move the vertical center (d) upwards for the next row.

The print() statement at the end of the outer loop prints a newline character, moving to the next row in the pattern.

Overall, this code generates a cross pattern made of asterisks (*) with the specified size (n) and ensures that the cross is properly centered both horizontally and vertically.

Wednesday 20 March 2024

Python Coding challenge - Day 153 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 

Code: 

def some_func(a, b, c=0, d=1):

    return a + b + c + d

result = some_func(1, 2, d=4)

print(result)

Solution and Explanation: 

This code defines a function named some_func which takes four parameters: a, b, c, and d. Parameters c and d have default values of 0 and 1 respectively. The function calculates the sum of all four parameters and returns the result.

Here's the breakdown of the function:

a, b, c, and d are parameters representing values that can be passed into the function.

c=0 and d=1 in the function signature are default parameter values. This means if you call the function without providing values for c and d, they will default to 0 and 1 respectively.

Inside the function, it calculates the sum of a, b, c, and d and returns the result.

Now, when the function is called with some_func(1, 2, d=4), the values passed are a=1, b=2, c is not specified (so it takes the default value of 0), and d=4. Therefore, the function computes 1 + 2 + 0 + 4, which equals 7.

Finally, the result, which is 7, is printed using print(result).

Tuesday 19 March 2024

Python Coding challenge - Day 152 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 

def foo(x, y=[]):

    y.append(x)

    return y

print(foo(1))

print(foo(2))


This code defines a function foo that takes two arguments x and y, with y having a default value of an empty list []. Let's break down what happens:

def foo(x, y=[]):: This line defines a function named foo with two parameters, x and y. If y is not provided when calling the function, it defaults to an empty list [].

y.append(x): This line appends the value of x to the list y. Since y is a mutable object and is provided as a default argument, it retains its state across multiple calls to the function.

return y: This line returns the modified list y.

print(foo(1)): This line calls the foo function with x equal to 1. Since y is not provided explicitly, it defaults to [], which becomes [1] after appending 1 to it. So, it prints [1].

print(foo(2)): This line calls the foo function again, this time with x equal to 2. The default value of y is [1] now (the list modified in the previous call). So, 2 is appended to the existing list, resulting in [1, 2]. It prints [1, 2].

However, there's a caveat with this code due to the default mutable argument y=[]. If you call the function foo without providing a value for y, it'll reuse the same list across multiple function calls. This can lead to unexpected behavior if you're not careful. In this case, each time foo is called without specifying y, it keeps appending to the same list object. So, calling foo(1) modifies the list y to [1], and then calling foo(2) appends 2 to the modified list, resulting in [1, 2].

Python pattern challenge - Day 3

 

# Method 1: Using a loop

def print_sequence_loop(n):

    for i in range(n+1):

        print(f"{i}{'*' * i}")


# Method 2: Using list comprehension

def print_sequence_list_comprehension(n):

    sequence = [f"{i}{'*' * i}" for i in range(n+1)]

    print('\n'.join(sequence))


# Method 3: Using a generator function

def generate_sequence(n):

    for i in range(n+1):

        yield f"{i}{'*' * i}"


def print_sequence_generator(n):

    sequence = generate_sequence(n)

    for item in sequence:

        print(item)


# Testing the functions

n = 5


print("Using loop:")

print_sequence_loop(n)

print("\nUsing list comprehension:")

print_sequence_list_comprehension(n)

print("\nUsing generator function:")

print_sequence_generator(n)



Let's break down each part of the code:


Method 1: Using a loop

This method uses a loop to generate and print each element of the sequence.

def print_sequence_loop(n):
    for i in range(n+1):
        print(f"{i}{'*' * i}")
  • print_sequence_loop is a function that takes an integer n as input.
  • It iterates over the range from 0 to n (inclusive) using a for loop.
  • Inside the loop, it prints a string composed of the current number i followed by a number of asterisks (*) corresponding to the value of i.

Method 2: Using list comprehension

This method uses list comprehension to generate the sequence and then prints it.

def print_sequence_list_comprehension(n):
    sequence = [f"{i}{'*' * i}" for i in range(n+1)]
    print('\n'.join(sequence))
  • print_sequence_list_comprehension is a function that takes an integer n as input.
  • It uses list comprehension to generate a list where each element is a string composed of the current number i followed by a number of asterisks (*) corresponding to the value of i.
  • It then joins the elements of the list with newline characters ('\n') and prints the resulting string.

Method 3: Using a generator function

This method uses a generator function to lazily generate the sequence, and then prints it.

def generate_sequence(n):
    for i in range(n+1):
        yield f"{i}{'*' * i}"

def print_sequence_generator(n):
    sequence = generate_sequence(n)
    for item in sequence:
        print(item)
  • generate_sequence is a generator function that yields each element of the sequence lazily. It takes an integer n as input.
  • Inside the function, it iterates over the range from 0 to n (inclusive) using a for loop, yielding a string composed of the current number i followed by a number of asterisks (*) corresponding to the value of i.
  • print_sequence_generator is a function that takes an integer n as input.
  • It creates a generator object sequence by calling generate_sequence(n).
  • It then iterates over the elements of the generator using a for loop, printing each element.

The statistics module in Python

 

Calculating Mean:

import statistics


data = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

mean = statistics.mean(data)

print("Mean:", mean)


#clcoding.com

Mean: 3

Calculating Median:

import statistics


data = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

median = statistics.median(data)

print("Median:", median)


#clcoding.com

Median: 3

Calculating Mode:

import statistics


data = [1, 2, 2, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5]

mode = statistics.mode(data)

print("Mode:", mode)


#clcoding.com

Mode: 4

Calculating Variance:

import statistics


data = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

variance = statistics.variance(data)

print("Variance:", variance)


#clcoding.com

Variance: 2.5

Calculating Standard Deviation:

import statistics


data = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

std_dev = statistics.stdev(data)

print("Standard Deviation:", std_dev)


#clcoding.com

Standard Deviation: 1.5811388300841898

Calculating Quartiles:

import statistics


data = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

q1 = statistics.quantiles(data, n=4)[0]

q3 = statistics.quantiles(data, n=4)[-1]

print("First Quartile (Q1):", q1)

print("Third Quartile (Q3):", q3)


#clcoding.com

First Quartile (Q1): 1.5

Third Quartile (Q3): 4.5

Calculating Correlation Coefficient:

import statistics


data1 = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

data2 = [2, 4, 6, 8, 10]

corr_coeff = statistics.correlation(data1, data2)

print("Correlation Coefficient:", corr_coeff)


#clcoding.com

Correlation Coefficient: 1.0


Monday 18 March 2024

Python pattern challenge - Day 2

 

Method 1: Using Nested Loops

def print_pattern(rows):
    for i in range(rows):
        num = 1
        for j in range(1, i + 2):
            print(num, end='')
            num = num * (i + 1 - j) // j
        print()

print_pattern(5) 
 # Change the argument to adjust the number of rows

let's break down the code step by step:

def print_pattern(rows):: This line defines a function named print_pattern that takes one argument rows, which represents the number of rows in the pattern.

for i in range(rows):: This loop iterates over each row of the pattern. It goes from 0 to rows - 1.

num = 1: Initializes the variable num to 1 for each row. This variable will hold the numbers to be printed on each row.

for j in range(1, i + 2):: This loop iterates over each column in the current row. It goes from 1 to i + 1.

print(num, end=''): Prints the value of num without a newline character. This ensures that all numbers in the same row are printed on the same line.

num = num * (i + 1 - j) // j: This line updates the value of num for the next column. It calculates the next number in the row based on the previous number using the formula (i + 1 - j) / j. This formula generates Pascal's triangle pattern.

print(): Prints a newline character after printing all numbers in the current row, moving to the next row.

print_pattern(5): Calls the print_pattern function with an argument of 5, which means it will print a pattern with 5 rows. You can change this argument to adjust the number of rows in the pattern.

The pattern generated by this code resembles Pascal's triangle, where each number in a row is the sum of the two numbers directly above it in the previous row.

Method 2: Using Recursion

def print_pattern_recursive(rows):
    if rows == 0:
        return
    print_pattern_recursive(rows - 1)
    row = [1]
    for i in range(1, rows):
        row.append(row[-1] * (rows - i) // i)
    print("".join(map(str, row)))

print_pattern_recursive(5)  
# Change the argument to adjust the number of rows

 let's break down the code step by step:

def print_pattern_recursive(rows):: This line defines a function named print_pattern_recursive that takes one argument rows, which represents the number of rows in the pattern.

if rows == 0:: This is the base case for the recursion. If rows is equal to 0, the function returns immediately, as there's no pattern to print.

return: This statement exits the function immediately if the base case is met.

print_pattern_recursive(rows - 1): This is the recursive call. It calls the print_pattern_recursive function with rows - 1, effectively reducing the number of rows to be printed in each recursive call.

row = [1]: Initializes a list row with a single element, 1. This represents the first row of the pattern.

for i in range(1, rows):: This loop iterates over each row index starting from 1 up to rows - 1.

row.append(row[-1] * (rows - i) // i): This line calculates and appends the next number to the row list. It uses the formula to generate Pascal's triangle pattern: (previous_number * (rows - i)) / i. This formula generates each number in the current row based on the numbers in the previous row.

print("".join(map(str, row))): This line prints the current row as a string by joining all elements in the row list and separating them with an empty string. This effectively prints the numbers of the current row without spaces between them.

print_pattern_recursive(5): Calls the print_pattern_recursive function with an argument of 5, which means it will print a pattern with 5 rows. You can change this argument to adjust the number of rows in the pattern.

The pattern generated by this code is similar to Pascal's triangle, where each number in a row is the sum of the two numbers directly above it in the previous row. However, this code generates each row recursively.

Method 3: Using List Comprehension


def print_pattern_list_comprehension(rows):
    pattern = [[1]]
    [pattern.append([1] + [pattern[-1][j] + pattern[-1][j + 1] for j in range(len(pattern[-1]) - 1)] + [1]) for _ in range(1, rows)]
    [print("".join(map(str, p))) for p in pattern]

print_pattern_list_comprehension(5)  
# Change the argument to adjust the number of rows

Let's break down the code step by step:

def print_pattern_list_comprehension(rows):: This line defines a function named print_pattern_list_comprehension that takes one argument rows, representing the number of rows in the pattern.

pattern = [[1]]: Initializes a list pattern with a nested list containing a single element, which is [1]. This represents the first row of the pattern.

[pattern.append([1] + [pattern[-1][j] + pattern[-1][j + 1] for j in range(len(pattern[-1]) - 1)] + [1]) for _ in range(1, rows)]: This is a list comprehension that generates the pattern rows. It iterates over a range starting from 1 up to rows - 1.

pattern[-1] accesses the last row in the pattern list.

[pattern[-1][j] + pattern[-1][j + 1] for j in range(len(pattern[-1]) - 1)] generates the elements of the new row based on the previous row. It iterates over indices j of the previous row and calculates each element by summing adjacent elements.

[1] is appended at the beginning and end of the row to maintain the pattern structure.

pattern.append(...) adds the newly generated row to the pattern list.

[print("".join(map(str, p))) for p in pattern]: This is another list comprehension that prints each row of the pattern. It iterates over each row p in the pattern list, converts each element to a string, joins them without any separator using "".join(), and then prints the resulting string.

print_pattern_list_comprehension(5): Calls the print_pattern_list_comprehension function with an argument of 5, which means it will print a pattern with 5 rows. You can change this argument to adjust the number of rows in the pattern.

The pattern generated by this code is similar to Pascal's triangle, where each number in a row is the sum of the two numbers directly above it in the previous row. However, this code utilizes list comprehensions to generate and print the pattern efficiently.

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