Saturday 13 April 2024

Python library to filter and censor offensive language

 

from better_profanity import profanity

text = "What the hell is going on?"

censored_text = profanity.censor(text)

print(censored_text)  


#clcoding.com

Explanation: 

The line from better_profanity import profanity imports the profanity module from the better_profanity library. This module provides functions and utilities for filtering and censoring offensive language in text.

Here's a breakdown of the subsequent code:

text = "What the hell is going on?": This line assigns a string containing a sentence to the variable text. The sentence includes the word "hell," which is considered offensive.

censored_text = profanity.censor(text): This line uses the censor function from the profanity module to censor any profanity in the text variable. The function replaces offensive words with asterisks (*) or other censor characters.

print(censored_text): This line prints the censored version of the text to the console. In this case, since "hell" is considered offensive, it will be replaced with asterisks, resulting in a censored version of the original sentence.

So, the output of this code will be a censored version of the original text, where the offensive word "hell" is replaced with asterisks.


from better_profanity import profanity

text = "I can't believe he said that!"

has_profanity = profanity.contains_profanity(text)

print(has_profanity) 


#clcoding.com

Explanation:

The line from better_profanity import profanity imports the profanity module from the better_profanity library. This module provides functions and utilities for filtering and detecting offensive language in text.

Here's a breakdown of the subsequent code:

text = "I can't believe he said that!": This line assigns a string containing a sentence to the variable text. The sentence does not contain any explicit profanity.

has_profanity = profanity.contains_profanity(text): This line calls the contains_profanity function from the profanity module and passes the text variable as an argument. This function checks whether the provided text contains any profanity.

print(has_profanity): This line prints the result of the profanity check to the console. If the text contains any profanity, the result will be True; otherwise, it will be False.

After executing this code, the result printed to the console will indicate whether the provided text contains any profanity. Since the text "I can't believe he said that!" does not contain explicit profanity, the output will be False.



from better_profanity import profanity
custom_censor_words = ["heck", "darn", "frick"]
censor_word = profanity.load_censor_words(custom_censor_words)

#clcoding.com

Explanation:

The line from better_profanity import profanity imports the profanity module from the better_profanity library. This module provides functions and utilities for filtering and censoring offensive language in text.

Here's an explanation of the subsequent code:

custom_censor_words = ["heck", "darn", "frick"]: This line creates a list named custom_censor_words containing custom words that you want to be treated as profanity and censored.

censor_word = profanity.load_censor_words(custom_censor_words): This line calls the load_censor_words function from the profanity module and passes the custom_censor_words list as an argument. This function loads the custom censor words into the profanity filter.

However, there's a small correction here: The load_censor_words function doesn't return anything (None), so assigning its result to censor_word doesn't serve any purpose. It's primarily used to load the custom censor words into the profanity filter.

After executing this code, the profanity filter will include the custom censor words provided in the custom_censor_words list. Any occurrence of these words in the text will be censored according to the filter's settings.

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