Showing posts with label Python Coding Challenge. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Python Coding Challenge. Show all posts

Sunday 17 March 2024

Python Coding challenge - Day 151 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 


Let's break down the code:

s = 'clcoding'

index = s.find('n', -1)  

print(index)

s = 'clcoding': This line initializes a variable s with the string 'clcoding'.

index = s.find('n', -1): This line uses the find() method on the string s. The find() method searches for the specified substring within the given string. It takes two parameters: the substring to search for and an optional parameter for the starting index. If the starting index is negative, it counts from the end of the string.

In this case, 'n' is the substring being searched for.

The starting index -1 indicates that the search should start from the end of the string.

Since the substring 'n' is not found in the string 'clcoding', the method returns -1.

print(index): This line prints the value stored in the variable index, which is the result of the find() method. In this case, it will print -1, indicating that the substring 'n' was not found in the string 'clcoding'.

So, the overall output of this code will be -1.

Saturday 16 March 2024

Python Coding challenge - Day 150 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 



Let's break down each line:

my_tuple = (1, 2, 3): This line creates a tuple named my_tuple containing three elements: 1, 2, and 3.

x, y, z, *rest = my_tuple: This line uses tuple unpacking to assign values from my_tuple to variables x, y, z, and rest. The *rest syntax is used to gather any extra elements into a list called rest.


x is assigned the first element of my_tuple, which is 1.

y is assigned the second element of my_tuple, which is 2.

z is assigned the third element of my_tuple, which is 3.

*rest gathers any remaining elements of my_tuple (if any) into a list named rest. In this case, there are no remaining elements, so rest will be an empty list.

print(x, y, z, rest): This line prints the values of x, y, z, and rest.


x, y, and z are the values assigned earlier, which are 1, 2, and 3 respectively.

rest is an empty list since there are no remaining elements in my_tuple.

Therefore, when you run this code, it will output:

1 2 3 []

Operators - Lecture 2

 



Q:- What is Operator ?

 Operators are symbol or special characters that perform specific

operations on one or more operands (Values or Variables).

Assignment Question

1. Write a program that prompts the user to enter their name, age, and

favorite number. Calculate and print the product of their age and

favorite number.

2. Write a program that prompts the user for enter a sentence and then

check the length of the sentence and prints the sentence also.

3. Write a program that takes two sentences from user and then checks for

the length of both sentences using “Identity Operators”.

4. Write a program that takes a integer value from the user and checks that

the number is between 10 and 20 then it will print true or else false , use

Logical and & or operator both for checking the result.

5. Write the uses of all the operators which comes inside these operators

use comments in python for writing the uses :-

 Arithmetic operators

 Assignment operators

 Comparison operators

 Logical operators

 Identity operators


Basics of Coding - Lecture 1


1. What is coding?

->Coding refers to the process of creating instructions for a computer to

perform specific tasks. It involves writing lines of code using a programming

language that follows a defined syntax and set of rules.

Coding can be used to create software applications, websites, algorithms, and

much more. It is a fundamental skill in the field of computer science and in

essential for anyone interested in software development, data analysis,

machine learning, and various other technological domains.

2. What is algorithm?

->An algorithm is a set of clear and specific instructions that guide the

computer to solve a problem or complete a task efficiently and accurately. It’s

like a recipe that tells the computer exactly what do to achieve a desired

outcome.

3. Who created Python?

-> Python was created by Guido van Rossum. He started developing Python in

the late 1980s, and the first version of the programming language was released

in 1991.

4. What is Python?

->Python is a popular and easy to learn programming language. It is known for

it’s simplicity and readability, making it a great choice for beginners. Python is

versatile and can be used for a wide range of tasks, from web development to

data analysis and artificial intelligence. It’s clear syntax and extensive library

support make it efficient and productive for software development. Overall,

Python is a powerful yet user-friendly language that is widely used in the tech

industry.

Assignment Questions

1. Declare two variables, x and y, and assign them the values 5

and 3, respectively. Calculate their sum and print the result.

2. Declare a variable radius and assign it a value of 7. Calculate the

area of a circle with that radius and print the result.


3. Declare a variable temperature and assign it a value of 25.

Convert the temperature from Celsius to Fahrenheit and print the

result.

4. Declare three variables a, b, and c and assign them the values

10, 3.5, and 2, respectively. Calculate the result of a divided by the

product of b and c and print the result.

5. Declare a variable initial_amount and assign it a value of 1000.

Calculate the compound interest after one year with an interest rate

of 5% and print the result.

6. Declare a variable seconds and assign it a value of 86400.

Convert the seconds into hours, minutes, and seconds, and print the

result in the format: "hh:mm:ss".

7. Declare a variable numerator and assign it a value of 27.

Declare another variable denominator and assign it a value of 4.

Calculate the integer division and remainder of numerator divided by

denominator and print both results.

8. Declare a variable length and assign it a value of 10. Calculate

the perimeter and area of a square with that length and print the

results.

Thursday 14 March 2024

Python Coding challenge - Day 149 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 


Let's break down the given code:

for i in range(1, 3):

    print(i, end=' - ')

This code snippet is a for loop in Python. Let's go through it step by step:

for i in range(1, 3)::

This line initiates a loop where i will take on values from 1 to 2 (inclusive). The range() function generates a sequence of numbers starting from the first argument (1 in this case) up to, but not including, the second argument (3 in this case).

So, the loop will iterate with i taking on the values 1 and 2.

print(i, end=' - '):

Within the loop, this line prints the current value of i, followed by a dash (-), without moving to the next line due to the end=' - ' parameter.

So, during each iteration of the loop, it will print the value of i followed by a dash and space.

When you execute this code, it will output:

1 - 2 - 

Explanation: The loop runs for each value of i in the range (1, 3), which are 1 and 2. For each value of i, it prints the value followed by a dash and space. So, the output is 1 - 2 - .







Tuesday 12 March 2024

Python Coding challenge - Day 148 | What is the output of the following Python Code?





Let's break down the provided code:

d = {'Milk': 1, 'Soap': 2, 'Towel': 3}

if 'Soap' in d:

    print(d['Soap'])

d = {'Milk': 1, 'Soap': 2, 'Towel': 3}: This line initializes a dictionary named d with three key-value pairs. Each key represents an item, and its corresponding value represents the quantity of that item. In this case, there are items such as 'Milk', 'Soap', and 'Towel', each associated with a quantity.

if 'Soap' in d:: This line checks whether the key 'Soap' exists in the dictionary d. It does this by using the in keyword to check if the string 'Soap' is a key in the dictionary. If 'Soap' is present in the dictionary d, the condition evaluates to True, and the code inside the if block will execute.

print(d['Soap']): If the key 'Soap' exists in the dictionary d, this line will execute. It retrieves the value associated with the key 'Soap' from the dictionary d and prints it. In this case, the value associated with 'Soap' is 2, so it will print 2.

So, in summary, this code checks if the dictionary contains an entry for 'Soap'. If it does, it prints the quantity of soap available (which is 2 in this case).

Monday 11 March 2024

Python Coding challenge - Day 147 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 


In Python, the is operator checks whether two variables reference the same object in memory, while the == operator checks for equality of values. Now, let's analyze the given code:

g = (1, 2, 3)

h = (1, 2, 3)

print(f"g is h: {g is h}")

print(f"g == h: {g == h}")

Explanation:

Identity (is):

The g is h expression checks if g and h refer to the same object in memory.

In this case, since tuples are immutable, Python creates separate objects for g and h with the same values (1, 2, 3).

Equality (==):


The g == h expression checks if the values contained in g and h are the same.

Tuples are compared element-wise. In this case, both tuples have the same elements (1, 2, 3).

Output:

The output of the code will be:

g is h: False

g == h: True

Explanation of Output:

g is h: False: The is operator returns False because g and h are distinct objects in memory.

g == h: True: The == operator returns True because the values inside g and h are the same.

In summary, the tuples g and h are different objects in memory, but they contain the same values, leading to == evaluating to True.

Sunday 10 March 2024

Python Coding challenge - Day 146 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 


Let's go through the code step by step:

years = 5: Initializes a variable named years with the value 5.

if True or False:: This is an if statement with a condition. The condition is True or False, which will always be True because the logical OR (or) operator returns True if at least one of the operands is True. In this case, True is always True, so the condition is satisfied.

years = years + 2: Inside the if block, there's an assignment statement that adds 2 to the current value of the years variable. Since the condition is always True, this line of code will always be executed.

print(years): Finally, this line prints the current value of the years variable.

As a result, the code will always enter the if block, increment the value of years by 2 (from 5 to 7), and then print the final value of years, which is 7.

Saturday 9 March 2024

try and except in Python

 


Example 1: Handling a Specific Exception

try:

    # Code that might raise an exception

    num = int(input("Enter a number: "))

    result = 10 / num

    print("Result:", result)

except ZeroDivisionError:

    # Handle the specific exception (division by zero)

    print("Error: Cannot divide by zero.")

except ValueError:

    # Handle the specific exception (invalid input for conversion to int)

    print("Error: Please enter a valid number.")

    

#clcoding.com

Enter a number: 5

Result: 2.0

Example 2: Handling Multiple Exceptions

try:

    file_name = input("Enter the name of a file: ")

    

    # Open and read the contents of the file

    with open(file_name, 'r') as file:

        contents = file.read()

        print("File contents:", contents)

except FileNotFoundError:

    # Handle the specific exception (file not found)

    print("Error: File not found.")

except PermissionError:

    # Handle the specific exception (permission error)

    print("Error: Permission denied to access the file.")

    

except Exception as e:

    # Handle any other exceptions not explicitly caught

    print(f"An unexpected error occurred: {e}")

    #clcoding.com

Enter the name of a file: clcoding

Error: File not found.

Example 3: Using a Generic Exception

try:

    # Code that might raise an exception

    x = int(input("Enter a number: "))

    y = 10 / x

    print("Result:", y)

except Exception as e:

    # Catch any type of exception

    print(f"An error occurred: {e}")

    

 #clcoding.com

Enter a number: 5

Result: 2.0

Python Coding challenge - Day 145 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 


Let's evaluate the provided Python code:

a = 20 or 40

if 30 <= a <= 50:

    print('Hello')

else:

    print('Hi')

Here's a step-by-step breakdown:

Assignment of a:

a = 20 or 40: In Python, the or operator returns the first true operand or the last operand if none are true. In this case, 20 is considered true, so a is assigned the value 20.

Condition Check:

if 30 <= a <= 50:: Checks whether the value of a falls within the range from 30 to 50 (inclusive).

Print Statement Execution:

Since a is assigned the value 20, which is outside the range 30 to 50, the condition is not met.

Therefore, the else block is executed, and the output will be Hi.

Let's run through the logic:

Is 30 <= 20 <= 50? No.

So, the else block is executed, and 'Hi' is printed.

The output of this code will be:

Hi

Friday 8 March 2024

Lambda Functions in Python

 


Example 1: Basic Syntax

# Regular function

def add(x, y):

    return x + y

# Equivalent lambda function

lambda_add = lambda x, y: x + y

# Using both functions

result_regular = add(3, 5)

result_lambda = lambda_add(3, 5)

print("Result (Regular Function):", result_regular)

print("Result (Lambda Function):", result_lambda)

#clcoding.com

Result (Regular Function): 8

Result (Lambda Function): 8

Example 2: Sorting with Lambda

# List of tuples

students = [("Alice", 25), ("Bob", 30), ("Charlie", 22)]

# Sort by age using a lambda function

sorted_students = sorted(students, key=lambda student: student[1])

print("Sorted Students by Age:", sorted_students)

#clcoding.com

Sorted Students by Age: [('Charlie', 22), ('Alice', 25), ('Bob', 30)]

Example 3: Filtering with Lambda

# List of numbers

numbers = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

# Filter even numbers using a lambda function

even_numbers = list(filter(lambda x: x % 2 == 0, numbers))

print("Even Numbers:", even_numbers)

#clcoding.com

Even Numbers: [2, 4, 6, 8]

Example 4: Mapping with Lambda

# List of numbers

numbers = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

# Square each number using a lambda function

squared_numbers = list(map(lambda x: x**2, numbers))

print("Squared Numbers:", squared_numbers)

#clcoding.com

Squared Numbers: [1, 4, 9, 16, 25]

Example 5: Using Lambda with max function

# List of numbers

numbers = [10, 5, 8, 20, 15]

# Find the maximum number using a lambda function

max_number = max(numbers, key=lambda x: -x)  # Use negation for finding the minimum

print("Maximum Number:", max_number)

#clcoding.com

Maximum Number: 5

Example 6: Using Lambda with sorted and Multiple Criteria

# List of dictionaries representing people with names and ages

people = [{"name": "Alice", "age": 25}, {"name": "Bob", "age": 30}, {"name": "Charlie", "age": 22}]

# Sort by age and then by name using a lambda function

sorted_people = sorted(people, key=lambda person: (person["age"], person["name"]))

print("Sorted People:", sorted_people)

#clcoding.com

Sorted People: [{'name': 'Charlie', 'age': 22}, {'name': 'Alice', 'age': 25}, {'name': 'Bob', 'age': 30}]

Example 7: Using Lambda with reduce from functools

from functools import reduce

# List of numbers

numbers = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

# Calculate the product of all numbers using a lambda function and reduce

product = reduce(lambda x, y: x * y, numbers)

print("Product of Numbers:", product)

#clcoding.com

Product of Numbers: 120

Example 8: Using Lambda with Conditional Expressions

# List of numbers

numbers = [10, 5, 8, 20, 15]

# Use a lambda function with a conditional expression to filter and square even numbers

filtered_and_squared = list(map(lambda x: x**2 if x % 2 == 0 else x, numbers))

print("Filtered and Squared Numbers:", filtered_and_squared)

#clcoding.com

Filtered and Squared Numbers: [100, 5, 64, 400, 15]

Example 9: Using Lambda with key in max and min to Find Extremes

# List of tuples representing products with names and prices

products = [("Laptop", 1200), ("Phone", 800), ("Tablet", 500), ("Smartwatch", 200)]

# Find the most and least expensive products using lambda functions

most_expensive = max(products, key=lambda item: item[1])

least_expensive = min(products, key=lambda item: item[1])

print("Most Expensive Product:", most_expensive)

print("Least Expensive Product:", least_expensive)

#clcoding.com

Most Expensive Product: ('Laptop', 1200)

Least Expensive Product: ('Smartwatch', 200)

Python Coding challenge - Day 144 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 

The code print(()*3) in Python will print an empty tuple three times.

Let's break down the code:

print(): This is a built-in function in Python used to output messages to the console.

(): This represents an empty tuple. A tuple is an ordered collection of items similar to a list, but unlike lists, tuples are immutable, meaning their elements cannot be changed after creation.

*3: This is the unpacking operator. In this context, it unpacks the empty tuple three times.

Since an empty tuple by itself doesn't contain any elements to print, it essentially prints nothing three times. So the output of this code will be an empty line repeated three times.

Wednesday 6 March 2024

Python Coding challenge - Day 143 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 


This code defines a function named g1 that takes two parameters: x and d with a default value of an empty dictionary {}. The function updates the dictionary d by setting the key x to the value x and then returns the updated dictionary.

Here's a step-by-step explanation of the code:

def g1(x, d={}):: This line defines a function g1 with two parameters, x and d. The parameter d has a default value of an empty dictionary {}.

d[x] = x: This line updates the dictionary d by assigning the value of x to the key x. This essentially adds or updates the key-value pair in the dictionary.

return d: The function returns the updated dictionary d.

print(g1(5)): This line calls the function g1 with the argument 5. Since no value is provided for the d parameter, it uses the default empty dictionary {}. The dictionary is then updated to include the key-value pair 5: 5. The function returns the updated dictionary, and it is printed.

The output of print(g1(5)) will be:

{5: 5}

It's important to note that the default dictionary is shared across multiple calls to the function if no explicit dictionary is provided. This can lead to unexpected behavior, so caution should be exercised when using mutable default values in function parameters.






Tuesday 5 March 2024

Python Coding challenge - Day 142 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 


In Python, the expressions within curly braces {} are evaluated as set literals. However, the expressions 1 and 2 and 1 or 3 are not directly used to create sets. Instead, these expressions are evaluated as boolean logic expressions and the final results are used to create sets.

Let's break down the expressions:

s1 = {1 and 2}

s2 = {1 or 3}

result = s1 ^ s2

print(result)

1 and 2: This expression evaluates to 2 because and returns the last truthy value (2 is the last truthy value in the expression).

1 or 3: This expression evaluates to 1 because or returns the first truthy value (1 is the first truthy value in the expression).

Therefore, your sets become:

s1 = {2}

s2 = {1}

result = s1 ^ s2

print(result)

Output:

{1, 2}

In this example, the ^ (symmetric difference) operator results in a set containing elements that are unique to each set ({1, 2}).

Sunday 3 March 2024

Slicing in Python

 

Example 1: Slicing a List

# Slicing a list

numbers = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

# Get elements from index 2 to 5 (exclusive)

subset = numbers[2:5]

print(subset)  # Output: [2, 3, 4]

#clcoding.com

[2, 3, 4]

Example 2: Omitting Start and End Indices

# Omitting start and end indices

subset = numbers[:7]  # From the beginning to index 6

print(subset)  # Output: [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

subset = numbers[3:]  # From index 3 to the end

print(subset)  # Output: [3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

#clcoding.com

[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

[3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

Example 3: Using Negative Indices

# Using negative indices

subset = numbers[-4:-1]  

print(subset)  

#clcoding.com

[6, 7, 8]

Example 4: Slicing a String

# Slicing a string

text = "Hello, Python!"

# Get the substring "Python"

substring = text[7:13]

print(substring)  # Output: Python

#clcoding.com

Python

Example 5: Step in Slicing

# Step in slicing

even_numbers = numbers[2:10:2]  

print(even_numbers)  

#clcoding.com

[2, 4, 6, 8]

Example 6: Slicing with Stride

# Slicing with stride

reverse_numbers = numbers[::-1] 

print(reverse_numbers)  

#clcoding.com

[9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0]

Example 7: Slicing a Tuple

# Slicing a tuple

my_tuple = (1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

# Get a sub-tuple from index 1 to 3

subset_tuple = my_tuple[1:4]

print(subset_tuple)  # Output: (2, 3, 4)

#clcoding.com

(2, 3, 4)

Example 8: Modifying a List with Slicing

# Modifying a list with slicing

letters = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e']

# Replace elements from index 1 to 3

letters[1:4] = ['x', 'y', 'z']

print(letters)  

#clcoding.com

['a', 'x', 'y', 'z', 'e']

Saturday 2 March 2024

Python Coding challenge - Day 141 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 


The above code defines a string variable my_string with the value "hello, world!" and then extracts a substring from index 2 to 6 (7 is exclusive) using slicing. Finally, it prints the extracted substring. Here's the breakdown:

my_string = "hello, world!"

substring = my_string[2:7]

print(substring)

Output:

llo, 

In Python, string indexing starts from 0, so my_string[2] is the third character, which is "l", and my_string[7] is the eighth character, which is the space after the comma. Therefore, the substring "llo, " is extracted and printed.

The zip function in Python

 


Example 1: Basic Usage of zip

# Basic usage of zip

names = ["Alice", "Bob", "Charlie"]

ages = [25, 30, 35]

# Combining lists using zip

combined_data = zip(names, ages)

# Displaying the result

for name, age in combined_data:

    print(f"Name: {name}, Age: {age}")

    #clcoding.com

Name: Alice, Age: 25

Name: Bob, Age: 30

Name: Charlie, Age: 35

Example 2: Different Lengths in Input Iterables

# Zip with different lengths in input iterables

names = ["Alice", "Bob", "Charlie"]

ages = [25, 30]

# Using zip with different lengths will stop at the shortest iterable

combined_data = zip(names, ages)

# Displaying the result

for name, age in combined_data:

    print(f"Name: {name}, Age: {age}")

    

#clcoding.com

Name: Alice, Age: 25

Name: Bob, Age: 30

Example 3: Unzipping with zip

# Unzipping with zip

names = ["Alice", "Bob", "Charlie"]

ages = [25, 30, 35]

# Combining lists using zip

combined_data = zip(names, ages)

# Unzipping the result

unzipped_names, unzipped_ages = zip(*combined_data)

# Displaying the unzipped data

print("Unzipped Names:", unzipped_names)

print("Unzipped Ages:", unzipped_ages)

#clcoding.com

Unzipped Names: ('Alice', 'Bob', 'Charlie')

Unzipped Ages: (25, 30, 35)

Example 4: Using zip with Dictionaries

# Using zip with dictionaries

keys = ["name", "age", "city"]

values = ["Alice", 25, "New York"]

# Creating a dictionary using zip

person_dict = dict(zip(keys, values))

# Displaying the dictionary

print(person_dict)

#clcoding.com

{'name': 'Alice', 'age': 25, 'city': 'New York'}

Example 5: Transposing a Matrix with zip

# Transposing a matrix using zip

matrix = [

    [1, 2, 3],

    [4, 5, 6],

    [7, 8, 9]

]

# Using zip to transpose the matrix

transposed_matrix = list(zip(*matrix))

# Displaying the transposed matrix

for row in transposed_matrix:

    print(row)

#clcoding.com

(1, 4, 7)

(2, 5, 8)

(3, 6, 9)

Example 6: Using zip with enumerate

# Using zip with enumerate

names = ["Alice", "Bob", "Charlie"]

# Combining with enumerate to get both index and value

indexed_names = list(zip(range(len(names)), names))

# Displaying the result

for index, name in indexed_names:

    print(f"Index: {index}, Name: {name}")

#clcoding.com

Index: 0, Name: Alice

Index: 1, Name: Bob

Index: 2, Name: Charlie

Python Coding challenge - Day 140 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 


Let's break down the code:

x = 5

y = 2

x *= -y

print(x, y)

Here's what happens step by step:


x is initially assigned the value 5.

y is initially assigned the value 2.

x *= -y is equivalent to x = x * -y, which means multiplying the current value of x by -y and assigning the result back to x.

Therefore, x becomes 5 * -2, resulting in x being updated to -10.

The print(x, y) statement prints the current values of x and y.

So, the output of this code will be:

-10 2

Thursday 29 February 2024

Python Coding challenge - Day 139 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 


Let's break down the code step by step:

Function Definition:

def custom_function(b):

This line defines a function named custom_function that takes a parameter b.

Conditional Statements:

if b < 0:

    return 20

This block checks if the value of b is less than 0. If it is, the function returns the integer 20.

if b == 0:

    return 20.0

This block checks if the value of b is equal to 0. If it is, the function returns the floating-point number 20.0.

if b > 0:

    return '20'

This block checks if the value of b is greater than 0. If it is, the function returns the string '20'.

Function Call:

print(custom_function(-3))

This line calls the custom_function with the argument -3 and prints the result.

Output Explanation:

The argument is -3, which is less than 0. Therefore, the first condition is true.

The function returns the integer 20.

The print statement then outputs 20.

So, the output of the provided code will be:

20

This is because the function returns the integer 20 when the input is less than 0.

Sunday 25 February 2024

Python Coding challenge - Day 137 | What is the output of the following Python Code?

 


a = [1, 2, 3, 4]

b = [1, 2, 5]

print(a < b)

Two lists, a and b, are defined.

a is [1, 2, 3, 4]

b is [1, 2, 5]

The code uses the less-than (<) operator to compare the two lists a and b. This comparison is performed element-wise.

The first elements of both lists are equal (1 == 1).

The second elements are equal (2 == 2).

The third elements are different (3 in a and 5 in b).

The less-than comparison stops at the first differing element. Since 3 is less than 5, the entire comparison evaluates to True.

The result of the comparison is printed using print(a < b), and it will output True.

So, the output of the code is:

True

This is because, in lexicographical order, the list a is considered less than the list b due to the first differing element at index 2.

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